CA Teaching

Prompted by a suggestion made by Timothy Halkowski (Wisconsin) Ruth Parry (Nottingham) and other colleagues, here’s a list of  clips from TV shows and so on that might be used to help get across language-in-interaction concepts to students. More recent suggestions nearer the top. More always welcome (send to me at c.antaki@Lboro.ac.uk).

Jaume Batlle Rodríguez

Jaume has kindly sent in some lively sources for use in Spanish-language CA teaching.

This is a Colombian telemarketing phone call audio that Jaume uses for teaching about interruptions, turn-taking, sequences and also the progressivity of talk.

This video shows a waiter (actually a confederate) subverting expected institutional norms. It’s an uncomfortable prank piece, but the participants presumably gave permission for it to be broadcast.  Not for the squeamish, perhaps, but Jaume reports that it’s very useful for illustrating the characteristics of institutional interaction, intersubjectivity and preference responses.

Uwe Küttner

Uwe’s suggestions mine the fertile seam of the US sitcom “Big Bang Theory”

Sheldon:      ((knocks on Leonard’s door))
Leonard:      What is it?
Sheldon:      I made tea?
Leonard:      I don’t want tea.
Sheldon:      I didn’t make tea for you… this is my tea.


Ruth Parry:

More clips from comedy shows


More clips useful for teaching, suggested by Adam Brandt (Newcastle-upon-Tyne):


One from Cade Bushnell (University of Tsukuba):


Another set of video clips useful for teaching language in interaction, this time from Edward Reynolds (University of New Hampshire):


Jenny Mandelbaum offers these videos that she and colleagues use in teaching CA at Rutgers:

Jenny adds that YouTube has a free downloader, called YTD Video Downloader, available at http://download.cnet.com/YTD-Video-Downloader/3000-2071_4-10647340.html


Two of my own favourites:

  • Emily Hofstetter has two lively and highly accessible tutorials on her CA youtube channel: on repair and on response relevance.
  • More comedy routines: this (rather ancient) one from the British comedy duo Ronnie Corbett and Ronnie Barker (both now deceased), is useful for illustrating the power of Grice’s maxim of relevance.
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